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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

4 edition of Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European found in the catalog.

Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European

linguistic and archaeological considerations : papers presented at an international symposium held at the Tvärminne Research Station of the University of Helsinki, 8-10 January, 1999

by

  • 115 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura in Helsinki .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indo-European antiquities -- Congresses.,
  • Uralic peoples -- Antiquities -- Congresses.,
  • Uralic languages -- Congresses.,
  • Indo-European languages -- Congresses.,
  • Anthropological linguistics -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Christian Carpelan, Asko Parpola and Petteri Koskikallio.
    GenreCongresses.
    SeriesSuomalais-ugrilaisen Seuran toimituksia,, 242
    ContributionsParpola, Asko., Koskikallio, Petteri.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsGN539 .E37 2001
    The Physical Object
    Pagination456 p. :
    Number of Pages456
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3639062M
    ISBN 109525150593
    LC Control Number2002445258

      Journal of Indo-European Stud nos. (): “Response to Kassian et al., ‘Proto-Indo-European-Uralic comparison from the probabilistic point of view’.” Ringe, Don. Link Rarely does a response to a paper become a must-read, when the paper itself deserves only a passing look. Koivulehto, Jorma (), The earliest contacts between Indo-European and Uralic speakers in the light of lexical loans. In: Carpelan, Christian, Parpola, Asko & Koskikallio, Petri (eds.), Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European, Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations. The purported etymology of Thing (assembly) from the Wikipedia reads as follows: " The Old Norse, Old Frisian and Old English þing with the meaning "assembly" is identical in origin to the English word thing, German Ding, Dutch ding, and modern Scandinavian ting when meaning "object". They are derived from Common Germanic *þengan meaning "appointed time", and . Carpelan, Christian & Asko Parpola & Petteri Koskikallio (eds.) Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations. MSFOu Hock, Hans Henrich & Brian D. Joseph Language history, language change and language relationship. An introduction to historical and comparative linguistics.


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Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European Download PDF EPUB FB2

Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and archaeological considerations: papers presented at an international symposium held at (Suomalais-ugrilaisen Seuran toimituksia) [Christian Carpelan, Asko Parpola, Petteri Koskikallio] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic Format: Paperback. Early Contacts Between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations: Papers Presented at an International Symposium Held at the Tvärminne Research Station of the University of Helsinki, January, Volume of Mémoires de la société finno-ougrienne, ISSN Indo-Uralic is a controversial hypothetical language family consisting of Indo-European and Uralic.

A genetic relationship between Indo-European and Uralic was first proposed by the Danish linguist Vilhelm Thomsen in (Pedersen ) but was received with little enthusiasm.

Since then, the predominant opinion in the linguistic community has remained Geographic distribution: Europe, Russia (Siberia).

Get this from a library. Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: linguistic and archaeological considerations: papers presented at an international symposium held at the Tvärminne Research Station of the University of Helsinki, January, The expansion of R1a1a1-M lineages from central Eurasia must have therefore disrupted the Early Proto-Indo-European R1b1a1a-P community thriving in east Europe.

In this context, R1a1a1-M – and not R1b1a1a-P – lineages might have spoken Indo-Uralic languages when arriving in the Forest Zone from the east. Homeland hypotheses Europe versus Siberia. It has been suggested that the Proto-Uralic homeland was located near the Ural Mountains, either on the European or the Siberian main reason to suppose that there was a Siberian homeland has been the traditional taxonomic model that sees the Samoyedic branch as splitting off first.

Because the present border between. Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations Christian Carpelan, Asko Parpola, Petteri Koskikallio (eds.) Papers presented at an international symposium held at the Tvärminne Research Station of.

Subject: Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archeological Considerations Carpelan, Christian, Asko Parpola and Petteri Koskikalio, ed.

() Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archeological Considerations, Finno-Ugrian Society. John Hammink, F-Secure Corporation. Christian Carpelan is the author of Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European ( avg rating, 3 ratings, 0 reviews, published )4/5(3).

Indo-European has been described as “a branch of Indo-Uralic which was transformed under the influence of a Caucasian substratum” [Kortlandt ], which would imply an invasion of Indo-Uralic-speaking peoples to a territory of previous Caucasian Caucasian influence has been supported recently by the finding of a genetic contribution (probably during.

Open access PhD thesis Indo-Iranian borrowings in Uralic: Critical overview of sound substitutions and distribution criterion, by Sampsa Holopainen, University of Helsinki (), under the supervision of Forsberg, Saarikivi, and Kallio.

Interesting excerpts (emphasis mine): The gap between Russian and Western scholarship. Many scholars in the Soviet Union. Early Uralic – Indo-European contacts within Europe One of the most interesting aspects for future linguistic research, boosted by the current knowledge in population genomics, is the influence of Uralic – most likely spread initially with Corded Ware peoples across northern Europe – on early Indo-European dialects.

Sanskrit: cloak, garment^ Lubotsky, Alexander (), “The Indo-Iranian substratum”, in Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations‎[1], Helsinki, page 8. The initial chapters of the book offer an introduction to the background and methodology of the reconstructions with a discussion of the spread of the Indo-Europeans, the role of general linguistics in linguistic reconstruction, the nature of mixed languages, the origin of the Goths, the relations between Indo-European, Uralic and Caucasian Cited by: 1.

Sanskrit: pain, unhappiness^ Lubotsky, Alexander (), “The Indo-Iranian substratum”, in Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations‎[1], Helsinki, page 8. Proposed homelands of the Proto-Uralic language include. The vicinity of the Volga River, west of the Urals, close to the Urheimat of the Indo-European languages, or to the east and southeast of the ian Gyula László places its origin in the forest zone between the Oka River and central Poland.E.

Setälä and M. Zsirai place it between the Volga and Kama phic distribution: Central, Eastern. between the areas of the Uralic and Semitic languages also fi ts their apparent contact with PIE. One of the leading archaeologist of the fi rst half of the 20th century, V.

Gordon Childe (–), likewise opted for the same solution in his book The Aryans: A study of Indo-European origins (). The Archaeology of Proto-historic Central Asia and the Problems of Identifying Indo-European and Uralic-speaking Populations.

Francfort, H.P. in ―Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations‖, ed. Carpelan, Parpola, Koskikallio Suomalais- Ugrilainen Seura, Helsinki, Contacts with unrelated languages. A second approach to determining the location of Proto-Uralic is based on contacts with other, unrelated languages as evidenced by loanwords from one group to the other.

Early Finno-Ugric borrowed numerous terms from very early dialects of Indo-European. Though these words are entirely lacking from the Samoyed. There have been claims about the relatedness of the Uralic and Indo-European language families.

For example, the plural nominative suffix -t in Finnish and -s in some Indo-European languages have been seen as the same thing by some. Previously, it. Haarmann bases his reconstruction of the history of both the IE and the Uralic family heavily on the book Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations, edited by Christian Carpelan et al.

(Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, Helsinki ), which remains on very shaky ground throughout though it is very. KUZMINA Contacts Between Finno-Ugric and Indo-Iranian Speakers in the light of Archaeological, Linguistic and Mythological Data. Kuzmina E. in ―Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations‖.

Carpelan, Parpola, Koskikallio. Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, Helsinki, File Size: 1MB. ern Europe. He has presented papers on the early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European in a number of international settings.

He is the co-editor (with Tony Hackens and Hagne Jungner) of Time and Environment: A PACT Seminar () and Early Contacts Between Uralic and Indo-European: Archaeological and Linguistic Considerations().

A Linguistic Map of Prehistoric Northern Europe is a collection of twelve papers that go back to an international workshop in Rakavere, Estonia in This feels like something of a sequel to Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European ed. Carpelan, Parpola and Koskikallio, published as volume in the same series.

Both volumes are highly recommended reading /5. He has presented papers on the early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European in a number of international settings. He is the co-editor (with Tony Hackens and Hagne Jungner) of Time and Environment: A PACT Seminar () and Early Contacts Between Uralic and Indo-European: Archaeological and Linguistic Considerations ().

"In The Precursors of Proto-Indo-European some of the world's leading experts in historical linguistics shed new light on two hypotheses about the prehistory of the Indo-European language family, the so-called Indo-Anatolian and Indo-Uralic hypotheses. Joining forces t o shed light on early contacts ( BC – AD) between Indo-European a nd Uralic speakers.

0 12 * 3Author: Martin Joachim Kümmel. "The author, who was director of the International Bee Research Association for 35 years, provides extensive coverage of historical methodological information about bees, beekeeping, and honey. It is an excellent reference source with chapters about honey-storing insects throughout the world, the origins of hive beekeeping in ancient Egypt, controlling bees, drinks made from 5/5(2).

Contacts Between Finno-Ugric and Indo-Iranian Speakers in the light of Archaeological, Linguistic and Mythological Data. Kuzmina E. in ―Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations‖. Carpelan, Parpola, Koskikallio. Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, Helsinki, Quoted in Talageri, S.

place when the local Neolithic Combed Ware culture, claimed to be Uralic, met the intrusive Indo-European Battle Axe culture arriving in Estonia and Finland. Moora dated the Battle Axe culture between and BC, and proposed that the contacts with Germanic began in the Bronze Age with infl uence from Scandinavia.

Häkkinen, Jaakko - Early Contacts between Uralic and Yukaghir, Häkkinen, Jaakko - Uralic Evidence for the Indo-European Homeland, Paabo, Andres - Email discussions during Mallory, J P, with D Q Adams (Eds) - Encyclopaedia of Indo-European Culture,   Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations Posted by Andis Kaulins at 12/15/ PM.

THE INDO-URALIC VERB. This paper re‐examines the evidence for early contacts between Proto‐Indo‐European (PIE) and the languages of the Caucasus.

Author: Frederik Kortlandt. B.7 Areal effects in prehistoric contacts between Uralic and Indo-European. The purpose of this symposium is to bring together scholars carrying out research either on early varieties of Uralic or Indo-European languages, or contacts between these two families.

Uralic languages - Uralic languages - Linguistic characteristics: The linguistic structure of Proto-Uralic has been partially reconstructed by a comparison of the similarities and differences among the known Uralic tongues. Not all existing similarities can be attributed to a common Uralic origin; some may also reflect universal pressures and limitations on language structure (e.g., the.

Koivulehto Jorma, The Earliest Contacts between IE and Uralic Speakers. Carpelan, Christian; Parpola, Asko & Kosk: between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archeological Considerations. Helsinki (Mémoires. Kuz’mina, E.E. Contacts between Finno-Ugric and Indo-Iranian speakers in the light of archaeological, linguistic and mythological data.

In: Christian Carpelan et al. (eds.), Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and archaeological considerations. Helsinki, –Author: Michaël Peyrot. Emergence, contacts and dispersal of Proto-Indo-European, Proto-Uralic and Proto-Aryan in archaeological Carpelan, Christian et al.

(eds.)Early contacts between Uralic and Indo-European. Linguistic and. Late Proto-Indo-European / Early Archaic Indo-European loanwords to Proto-Uralic These loanwords have been traditionally seen to have occurred between Proto-Indo-European and Proto-Uralic, as these stages were considered as contemporaneous (~ BC).

However, new linguistic results of. We can say very little with confidence, as the other answers make clear. We can confidently say that languages existed before Proto-Indo-European. (See: How many dead languages are there?) Immediately before Proto-Indo-European, we can think about.

The Trundholm sun chariot. The chariot pulling the sun is a common Indo-European mythological motif. Since I reference the Indo-Europeans and Proto-Indo-Europeans in several articles on this site, I figured it would be helpful to provide a brief overview of who these people were and why they matter, both in general and in the specific context of understanding the pre-Christian .Early Contacts between Uralic and Indo-European: Linguistic and Archaeological Considerations Posted by Andis Kaulins at 12/15/ PM Saturday, Decem Indo-Uralic is a hypothetical language family consisting of Indo-European and Uralic, which was already proposed in the 19th century and has been the subject of discussion ever linguists are not convinced of the relationship, but few would opine that Indo-European and Uralic could not be related.